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CS Week Executive Perspectives Video Series engages senior executives on the forefront of today's dynamic utility industry market.

 

CS Week 2016 Executive Perspectives

Executive Perspective | Angela Guillory | CS Week

 

 

THINKING SIDEWAYS: TAPPING INTO HIDDEN RESOURCES WITH EFFECTIVE LEADERSHIP

Chris Cardenas, VP Customer Service, PPL Electric Utilities

 

How has PPL Electric Utilities received 15 J.D. Power and Associates awards for customer satisfaction — more than any other utility in the United States? By thinking sideways, this executive explains how culture is everything.

  • Learn how a utility culture built on trust, inclusion, agent satisfaction and a clear, shared vision equates to happy customers;
  • Hear about PPL’s “intelligent desktop,” an overlay to 13 disparate systems and 30+ dialog screens to provide a 360° view of the customer;
  • Appreciate how leveraging information derived from system data and analytics helps this utility shape customer behavior and stay ahead anticipate customer needs; and
  • Develop and better deploy resources inherent in your organization through effective leadership.

Executive Perspective | Angela Guillory | CS Week

 

 

CUSTOMER CHOICE DRIVES SERVICE STRATEGY

Hallie Reese, Chief Customer OfficerExelon Utilities

Providing electric and gas services to 10 million Exelon Utilities customers across four states plus Washington, DC requires a consistent, cohesive customer strategy. But retaining individual utilities’ regional identity while aligning them with two core values - operational excellence and innovation to serve customers better - means a larger shared corporate vision. Choice in products, services, terms and channels drives everyone across this utility to focus the customer service lens even more clearly.

  • Work on collaborative strategy informed by the right stakeholders, internal, external and others who have weathered similar operational challenges and setbacks;
  • Exercise executive support to make the customer experience every employee’s responsibility;
  • Listen to front line employees, often customers themselves, who play a hugely important role in learning what processes and systems are broken, encouraging them push up information for resolution and push out consistent, cohesive messaging; and
  • Create fast, easy, convenient and robust customer engagement choices, recognizing that the customer base is not staying static.

Executive Perspective | Angela Guillory | CS Week

 

 

STORYTELLING FOR CUSTOMER ENGAGEMENT, EDUCATION AND INVESTMENT

Rebecca Stenholm, Director, Public & Government Affairs, Epcor Water Services (USA)

As the largest private regulated water utility serving Arizona and New Mexico, Epcor Water Services (USA) recognizes the power of storytelling. Diversity of communication tools and customers’ desires to tailor how and when they communicate with the utility are key changes in the customer-utility relationship.

  • Learn how one utility breaks through the clutter to make itself relevant to customers using multiple channels that include but are not limited to print, social media, websites and personal visits;
  • Invest utility time, pride and presence in communities served to build customer trust and ensure visibility; and
  • Hear about storytelling, whether through online portals, social media, public interactions, formal messaging or other tools, that offers need-to-know customer assurance for topics like water quality and supports utility service value and investment for subjects like infrastructure cost and replacement.

Executive Perspective | Angela Guillory | CS Week

 

 

KEYS TO DEVELOPING EFFECTIVE TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES

Joe TellezChief Technology Officer, Tacoma Public Utilities

The largest department in Tacoma City government and staffed by more than 1,200 employees, Tacoma Public Utilities is made up of Tacoma Power, Tacoma Water, Tacoma Rail, and the Click! Network television cable service.  This executive shines a light on current thinking for future technology strategic planning, efforts that align the IT organization and attract talent to establish and support the rapidly changing operational requirements of utility operations.

  • Position the IT organization to take both an external view via targeted market research and customer segmentation information and an internal view to determine what enabling technologies are right for today’s digital utility customer;
  • Converge operational technology (OT) with information technology (IT), including cyber security protocols, while recognizing IT management disciplines must be stood up for support and maintenance;
  • Invest in system integration capabilities that produce real-time analytics for data-driven IT and operational decision making; and
  • Prioritize the IT portfolio based on the careful balance among customer value, customer engagement, operational requirements and process efficiency.

Executive Perspective | Angela Guillory | CS Week

 

 

CLOUD TECHNOLOGY: SHIFTING OPINIONS INFORM SURVEY RESULTS

James Riley, Chief Strategy Officer, VertexOne

 

Having made a strategic decision to invest in cloud technology, VertexOne recently conducted an industry survey to gauge the pulse of electric, gas and water/wastewater utilities, small to large, with various ownership types, on this subject.

  • Learn how utilities, realizing they need proven providers in physical and cyber security, are increasingly choosing not to acquire and maintain equipment on their own property but instead to transfer infrastructure hosting and management to the cloud;
  • Recognize that capitalization of cloud-based solutions is an acceptable accounting practice for more and more utilities;
  • Appreciate the similarities utilities share for this technology with the financial services industry; and
  • See how this consultancy is partnering with utilities on cloud solutions, educating them to make informed choices and helping them respond to operational and technological pressures for change hurling ahead at a frighteningly fast pace.